SCP E96 Public-Private Integration and Interoperability, with David Pickeral

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In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, Zoe has an interesting discussion with entrepreneur and Smart Mobility advisor, David Pickeral. David shares his varied background from Naval Officer to practicing Law, to working with a variety of public and private organisations in the transit and technology arena. He tells us what sparked his interest in the Smart Mobility space, and how he sees the US embracing the Smart City and Community concepts. Zoe and David then cover the advantages of bottom-up, individualised approaches, and how integration and interoperability between government, industry and academia is key. They finish their chat discussing the emerging trend of public-private collaborations in the realm of Smart Mobility. As always, we hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it.

Listen here:

https://player.whooshkaa.com/player/episode/id/345311?visual=true&sharing=true

What we cover in this episode:

  • David’s varied background across a number of industries, and how he fell into this Smart Mobility space
  • How the discipline of Smart City or Holistic City Planning has evolved
  • What a Smart City is and why it’s so important
  • How David sees the US embracing the Smart City concept
  • The advantage of bottom-up, individualised approaches to Smart City changes
  • Some of the projects David is currently working on
  • How cloud-based and robust behind-the-scenes systems can enable integration and interoperability across different disciplines
  • Collaboration between the essential triangle of government, industry and academia that is needed for public good, not just for profit
  • The emerging trend of public-private partnerships and interoperability in mobility spaces

Quotes:

“It’s kind of hard to do Smart Cities and just focus on one aspect of it because being as it’s about the data, you really need to be able to deal with the city as an entire ecosystem—everything is dependent on each other.”

“It really is a city that uses the technology or resources that it has or that it has access to near term, and builds upon it. There’s never going to be a case in most of the world where you build a Smart City from the ground up…you’re going to add in different layers of technology, different layers of data, different layers of sensors and you get to a point where you improve the situation.”

“Most of the measures to improve transportation, or cities, or other infrastructure, or data access or wifi, were approved by voters; people want to invest in having Smart technology available within their city, not just buy a device and carry it around, but have the ability to get better information, use city services and engage with their city both at the government and the private sector level. I think they’re driving it… the strength of the US is going to be this local or as we say State-level initiative rather than big national initiatives.”

“It’s not about putting more and more sensors and devices out there necessarily, but using the data that is coming in…You don’t want to gather the same data twice.”

“People have learned the hard way that you really can’t do it on your own if you’re just government, and nor can you do it just industry and make money.”

“I think the big trend people aren’t talking about is that operating consumer based mobility services [T&C, micro transit, scooters, bikes] is never going to turn profit because the margins are so low… The money is not going to be in selling things to consumers, it’s going to be in monetising the cost take out to governments.”

Links:

Columbus Ohio US Dept Transportation Smart City Project

Los Angeles Metro has an Office of Extraordinary Innovation

 

Connect:

Connect with David via LinkedIn

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene.

E95 How Uber sees the future of transport, with Natalie Malligan

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In this bonus #mobilitymarch episode of the Smart Community Podcast, Zoe has a fascinating chat with Natalie Malligan, the Head of Cities for Australia and New Zealand at Uber. This is a short but jam packed episode, and it’s also a perfect follow up to our previous episode featuring Sampo Hietanen, all about Mobility as a Service, so if you haven’t listened to that episode yet, I’d recommend you go back and listen to it before this one, as Zoe and Natalie do talk about MaaS a bit here so Sampo’s episode will be useful for a bit more context in that regard. In this episode, Natalie shares a bit about how Uber sees the future of transport and some of their projects worldwide, including taking part in the Transport NSW Mobility as a Service Challenge, and integrating the public transport services into the Uber App in the City of Denver in the US. Zoe and Natalie discuss how Australian consumers and governments are embracing Smart concepts, and how this has changed over time, as well as why Uber has been so successful in become a household name. Natalie explains how Uber views their role in the transport sector, and some of their other projects like up-coming on-demand aircraft service Uber Elevate and the open data platform Movement. Natalie and Zoe finish their conversation on how Uber has changed their approach over the years, and the emerging trends of micro-mobility such as e-bikes and e-scooters. As always, we hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it.

Listen Here:

What we cover in this episode:

  • Natalie’s passion for mobility and what sparked her interest in the Smart Community Space
  • What a Smart City means to Natalie and why the concept so important for the inclusion of our community and the prosperity of the economy
  • How Natalie sees Australian consumers and governments embracing Smart concepts
  • The future of transport, as Uber sees it
  • What needs to happen for Mobility as a Service to become a reality in Australia
  • Some of the projects and plans happening worldwide with Uber, including integrating public transport into the app
  • How Uber views their role in the transport sector providing first- and last-mile solutions
  • Why Natalie believes Uber has been so successful in becoming a household name
  • The importance of open data and Uber’s platform, Movement
  • What Uber is doing differently now compared with when they first burst onto the scene
  • How to better integrate across disciplines, industries and government
  • The emerging trends of MaaS and micro-mobility, such as e-bikes and e-scooters

Quotes:

In the next 5 years, what’s going to happen as different modes of transports become connected, as people start using bikes and scooters, as we see flying cars introduced? There’s just so much to be excited about, as change is happening so rapidly.

Australians, as consumers, are really getting behind [Smart Mobility]. They want their cities to be more connected and Smarter, and I think we’re actually seeing our governments get on board as well…there’s a lot of interest in driving change and using technology to make our cities Smarter.

You need your governments not only backing [Smart Mobility solutions] but also allowing the private sector to be the experts in this area and to help them create solutions that work. And then you obviously need consumers who are willing to try and change behaviour. It takes a long time to change what we’ve always done and break habits, so consumers really getting on board and trying different things and using technology to change the way that they move [is important].

Our aim is to complement public transport. Mass transit, rail for example, will always remain the most efficient way to move large numbers of people from one place to another and we don’t aim to compete with that, we aim to provide solutions that are first- and last-mile, that get people to or from those transport hubs, and also to integrate all of those forms of transport into the one place so that it’s more convenient for a person to take that train or bus because they’re able to book and pay the whole of their journey getting to or from that mass transport node within the one app.

[Integration] starts with an openness of government to work with private industry, and to work across departments, and we’ve really seen over the last few years a massive change in the space. Obviously Uber’s entry into most markets wasn’t without controversy, but we’ve seen a change in how we’ve approached things and also the openness of governments to work with us and with other private companies.

Uber has learned a lot of lessons over the years and one of them is engagement up front. So, going to the policy makers and talking with them about how we can help their communities, and trying to understand their positions and their concerns, and jointly trying to find solutions. It’s a much more collaborative approach that we’ve taken [in recent years] and that we’re also seeing from governments as well, which is exciting.

Links

Transport NSW’s Mobility as a Service Challenge

Uber Elevate

Lime Electric Scooters

Uber’s open data platform, Movement

Connect:

Connect with Natalie via LinkedIn

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene.

SCP E94 Mobility as a Service to rival private car ownership, with Sampo Hietanen

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In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, Zoe speaks with Sampo Hietanen, the Founder and CEO at Maas Global, the world’s first Mobility-as-a-Service company. Zoe and Sampo discuss his background in transport planning and what sparked his interest in the Smart Community space, as well as how Finland is embracing Smart Concepts, including working towards a life where citizens don’t actually NEED a car. Sampo explains what “Mobility as a Service” is, and how his company MaaS Global came to be. He also shares a bit about its success in a relatively short period of time in Finland, and the plans to go live in other cities in the world, including Sydney. Zoe and Sampo explore why Mobility as a Service can only work when there is integration across different suppliers and systems and the importance of building trust with both the end user and mobility providers in order to facilitate that integration. They finish the conversation talking about the question we really should be asking about mobility in our communities, and how cities can be a part of that. As always, we hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we enjoyed making it.

Listen here:

What we cover in this episode:

  • Sampo’s background in transport planning and civil engineering, and what sparked his interest in this Smart Mobility space
  • What a Smart Community means to him and why it’s so important
  • How Finland is embracing these Smart Concepts, and in particular moving towards a life where you don’t need a car
  • What Mobility as a Service is and how it competes with car ownership
  • How MaaS Global came to be, their success so far in Finland and the plans to go live in several other cities in the world
  • Why Mobility as a Service can only work when there is integration across different suppliers and systems
  • The importance of building trust with both the end user and mobility providers in order to facilitate that integration
  • The question we really should be asking about mobility in our communities
  • The second chance cities have now to create places that are good for people, business and the environment

Quotes:

“If you have a car you have access to everywhere. This is great for the individual but the infrastructure needed if everybody wants and needs to pursue the same dream just becomes quite, the whole city outlook and the way that it’s constructed after that, does not fulfil our dream of the city. You like to connect, you like your car, but you don’t like all those motorways next to your house.”

“We treat the traffic in the same format as we do waste water: we put people and these cars in the pipes and we think that’s how it works, but people are much harder to manage than water.”

“The whole idea [of Mobility as a Service] is to be able to have enough fall-backs, have enough supply, enough density in the supply and then enough versatile supply to be able to guarantee the end user that yes, we can take care of all your journeys.”

“When you go and buy your car you’re not thinking about your next drive, you’re not thinking about your next week’s ride, you’re thinking a year ahead. So unless we as MaaS operators can guarantee that we can take care of all your rides for a year, we’re not really there, we’re not as big in the minds of people as owning a car.”

“[Building trust] is a much tougher game because we have to be really good for the end user, focus on them, but at the same time…only by the [other mobility providers] trusting us enough to allow us to integrate them can we actually even have a product.”

“I think that the biggest question for Smart Cities but also for world economic growth for the next decades is ‘What will be big enough to compare with car ownership?’ I don’t think we’re yet there.”

Connect:

Find the full show notes as: www.mysmart.community

Connect with Sampo www.maas.global or email sampo.hietanen@maas.global or on Twitter and LinkedIn

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene.

SCP E93 Investigating Smart Mobility around the world, with Zoe Eather

In this episode, producer Ellen Ronalds Keene interviews host Zoe Eather. Zoe shares what #MobilityMarch is, why she’s created it and what to expect on the show this month. Zoe also discusses a range of different aspects of Smart Mobility and explains how mobility is different from transport.

Next, Zoe talks about her up-coming Churchill Fellowship project which will see her travel across the world investigating Smart Mobility. She tells us where she’s going, who she’s meeting with and what she’s hoping to get out of the investigation.

Listen here:

Connect with Zoe via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene.

SCP E92 Smart Standards and Open Data, with Chris Cooper

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In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, I had a fascinating chat with Chris Cooper, engineer, social scientist and CTO of KnowNow Information Ltd. Chris tells us about his background and how understanding the causes of things that happen can help create change. We discuss how Chris sees the UK embracing Smart concepts and why Smart Standards are key to collaboration and interoperability in Smart Communities, as well as how to stay flexible even while using standards. We finish our conversation talking about the emerging trend of making open data compelling for the everyday person so we can hold leaders to account to make evidence-based decisions, especially in the age of things like Brexit. As always, I hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as I enjoyed making it.

Listen here:

What we discuss in this episode: 

  • Chris’s background in engineering and social science and how understanding people led him to the Smart City space
  • How Chris sees the UK embracing Smart concepts
  • Why Smart Standards are so important across the board, especially for collaboration and interoperability
  • The need to stay flexible while using standards
  • The emerging trend of open data being compelling to the everyday person and being used for evidence-based decision making

 

Quotes:

“It’s all about bringing great information and great actions and outcomes to people that put a smile on their face.”

“Broadly, I don’t think the Smart City market is embracing standards at all well. I think we pay lip service to them.”

“Standards help talk across silos. But fundamentally, the fact that we haven’t quite understood that in a Smart City, you don’t have a silo. You just have a service that works…We’re thinking silos because we’re thinking 19th century management control that [is a] top-down hierarchy.” 

“If you look at some of the cool things that are happening with the open data champions… it centers around putting not just data out there but making it compelling, making it interesting and engaging people in saying ‘hey, look at this and what does this mean for you?’, now that’s cool. We need to do more of that.”

 

Connect:

 

Connect with Chris on Twitter @MobilityCooper or via email chris.cooper@kn-i.com

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community 

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene

SCP E91 Actioning Alternative Fuels and Decarbonisation, with Larissa Rose

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In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, I had a brilliant conversation with Larissa Rose, the Managing Director for the Queensland Renewable Fuels Association. We discuss Larissa’s background as an environmental consultant, her Masters degree in renewable fuels and advanced biofuels, and how this sparked her interest in the Smart Community Space. Larissa tells us about the importance of future proofing a city, and how that relates to Smart City concepts, as well as what biofuels actually are, and some examples of different types of low carbon fuels. We talk about what’s happening in Australia regarding transitions to global regulatory pressure to reduce emissions, and the often overlooked health aspects of creating Smart Cities and Smart Communities. Larissa makes a point about air quality that might make you rethink your morning jog through the city streets.

We then explore how low carbon fuels, electric vehicles and hydrogen powered vehicles all fit together and specifically how they play their part in Australia. Larissa tells us about her trip to San Francisco for the Global Climate Action Summit, and how the QRFA foster collaboration from a global to domestic level. This includes their ‘paddock to parliament’ approach, which helps integrate across levels of government and different industries and disciplines. We finish our conversation discussing the emerging trend of fuel security in Australia, and the double benefit of progressive action on decarbonising the transport sector. This is a slightly longer episode than usual, but it’s a great conversation. As always I hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as I enjoyed making it.

Listen here:

What we cover in this episode:

  • Larissa’s background in renewable fuels and what sparked her interest in the Smart Community Space
  • The core components of a Smart City as Larissa sees it
  • The importance of future proofing a city and how that relates to Smart City concepts
  • What biofuels are and some examples of low carbon fuels
  • What Larissa she sees happening in Australia regarding transitions to global regulatory pressure to reduce emissions
  • The health aspects of a Smart City, clean air in Australia and a change Larissa instigated at a city level
  • How low carbon fuels, electric vehicles and hydrogen powered vehicles all fit together and specifically how they play their part in Australia
  • Larissa’s takeaways from the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco
  • The QRFA paddock to parliament approach and some projects they’re working on
  • What QRFA has done with Below 50 Australia to integrate in all parts of the supply chain, government and industry, from a global down to a domestic level
  • The emerging trend of fuel security in Australia
  • How to reduce our reliance on fuel and the double benefit of progressive action on decarbonising the transport sector

 

Quotes:

“[Cities] need to always, consistently, be applying innovation, looking at efficiencies and ensuring that sustainably is being managed. I think those are the key facets [of a Smart City].”

“Biofuels are first-generation fuels. Those fuels are alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. A familiar example is E10, a mixed-blended fuel. The biofuel [in it] is ethanol and is mixed with petroleum. When you see E10, that’s 10% ethanol (which is produced from an agricultural by-product) and is mixed with 90% blended petroleum. “

“Realistically, in Australia, we need all of those [fuels], whether electrification, hydrogen-based, mixed-blend fuel. They all play their own part based on a geographical location….We are not going to see full electric B-double trucks running across the Nullarbor, because they’re not going to be able to charge.”

“[At the Global Climate Action Summit] we were talking about how does it trigger and drive the local economies and cities to become smarter if there is a price on carbon? We don’t have one in Australia but in the US, they do. So, that has made a huge opportunity to the production and uptake of low-carbon fuels… [People are] incentivised for using them as well.”

“When you tell an everyday fuel consumer or passenger vehicle user, that they may only have 3 days of fuel if we were ever to get cut off of fuel in this country, that is a little bit of a reality in your face.”

“A lot of countries around the world have very significant fuel security policies put into place to ensure there’s large volumes of fuel kept in that country. Australia really needs to understand that we need to be doing that on a greater level. We are a very vulnerable country, very exposed… We rely on petroleum in all different ways, in so many different elements…we have the ability in Australia to produce quite a lot of clean renewable fuel and that would significantly displace the amount of petroleum that we would need to import.”

“The shifting change, I guess, that’s coming in to Australia that we’re seeing more and more now is Euro 6 spec vehicles that are coming in to our market.. these Euro 6 spec vehicles have greater vehicle  technology that can apply better fuel economy and that coupled on top of using biofuel blends, full replacement fuels, renewable fuels is going to be the game changer on how Australia can definitely capture CO2 reductions and reach some of its targets that it definitely needs to reach…”

“We are very accountable here in Australia to reaching some of those international targets that are being met. We’ve got a lot of work to do here in Australia. We can do a lot of that in transportation and obviously [transportation] is one of the biggest components to particulant matter and Co2 in this world…decarbonising the transport sector is on the forefront of everybody’s lips.

Progressive action on that is where we’ll see the change”

 

Connect:

Connect with Larissa via the Queensland Renewable Fuel Association website or on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

SCP E90 Starting with Smart Foundations, with Adam Davis

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In this episode of the Smart Community Podcast, I spoke with Adam Davis, the Director of TPL Connect, and a consultant in the design and delivery of Wired and Wireless Networks in Smart Cities, Data Centres, IoT, Telecommunications and Enterprise sectors. Adam shares with us his background as a cabling technician and project manager, and how working with local councils in ICT design and strategy really sparked his interest in the Smart City space.

Adam tells us how he sees Australia currently embracing the Smart City or Smart Region concept, and some of the mistakes he’s seen Councils make when adopting new technology. We discuss the importance of having an overarching vision or roadmap when undertaking any kind of Smart City planning, and what some of the key components of such a framework are. He shares some of the projects he’s currently working on, primarily focusing on the foundation layer such as fibre infrastructure to support wireless and sensor networks, and the amount of that foundation layer technology that is needed before the 5G network can be usable.

Adam says that boring foundation layer of infrastructure is something that’s often overlooked in the Smart arena, and how it’s an emerging trend/problem we should all be talking about more. We also cover the need for interoperability of new tech so that legacy systems don’t hinder progress, why councils need multidisciplinary teams in order for integration to be successful, and finish our chat discussing the emerging trend of skillset gaps in both city and regional teams, such as lack of data analysts, integration and systems thinking. As always I hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as I enjoyed making it.

Listen here:

What we cover in this episode:

  • Adam’s background as a Cabling Technician and Project Manager, and how he made the shift to start TPL Connect
  • How his work with Councils sparked his interest in the Smart Community space
  • What Smart means to Adam, and why invisibility is the mark of successful technology
  • The importance of overarching framework or vision for Smart City plans, and what some of the key components of that might be
  • The opportunities and challenges in Australia’s approach to Smart Regions
  • Foundation layer projects that Adam is working on, and why they’re so important
  • The hype around 5G and what the reality is actually like right now
  • The need for multidisciplinary teams in the regions to facilitate integration and break down silos
  • The emerging but overlooked trend of getting the foundation layer of infrastructure right
  • Legacy systems, new technology and interoperability
  • The emerging skillset gaps in Smart Region teams

Quotes:

”It’s different for every region but at the crux of it, [a Smart Community means] utilizing the data that you can garner from these technologies to make better and more informed decisions, which improves process, improves the lives of the constituents, [business] and the Council alike.”

“A lot of technologies have to be almost invisible…Has technology really succeeded when you don’t even know that you’re interacting with it?”

“What’s the overarching vision for the Smart City or Region? [Once Councils know that they can] work that into a set of defined principles that really reflect that vision…if the technology doesn’t really align to the principles, it won’t align to the vision, so it’s probably not worth implementing.”

“All those technologies have an effect in all streams of business—whether that be the water, the garbage, [the operational side]—the stakeholder management now is huge. And what they are actually deploying then needs to be handed off and be managed by what used to be the IT team. And, now, the IT team is getting more and more IOT Requirements lumped on them as these technologies are deployed. So, having that stakeholder management earlier on in the piece and working across on all streams of business, keeping everyone informed, and thinking about the operational side of the Smart Technology as well is [critical].”

“That’s when you see the successful regions, they’re actively working with local businesses and industry.”

“The boring foundation layer stuff is an overlooked area in the Smart City framework. The changing skillsets that are required within these teams—that’s a key considerable now. The hiring needs to be completely different [than before].”

“Actually looking at what the current requirements are, what the current environment looks like is probably a key thing that people aren’t talking about enough. People are too keen to just get there and be doing something, without having the proper planning.”

Connect:

Find the full show notes as: www.mysmart.community

Connect with Adam via LinkedIn or email adam.davis@tplconnect.com.au

Connect with me via email: hello@mysmart.community

Connect via LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook @smartcommpod

The Smart Community Podcast is produced by Ellen Ronalds Keene.